State of the Research: Violent Video Games – Aggression, Violence, and Desensitization

State of the Research: Violent Video Games – Aggression, Violence, and Desensitization

In this State of the Research, we tackle the most common questions about the uses and effects of violent video games:

Does playing violent video games make someone more aggressive?
Does playing violent video games make someone more violent?
Does playing violent video games desensitize players to violence?

Methodological considerations and the external validity of this research is also considered.

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This video was written, produced, and edited by Dr. Rachel Kowert, PhD.

Dr. Kowert holds a PhD in psychology and is an author and mom of three. For more information about her work, including a full list of publications, visit https://www.rkowert.com/.

Her first children’s book, Pragmatic Princess: 26 Superb Stories of Self-Sufficiency was successfully kickstarted and published in 2019. Learn more about that project here: https://buildyourowncastle.com/.

For a full list of available books, see: https://www.rkowert.com/books

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5 Comments

  1. Jonnathann Amorim on December 11, 2021 at 12:38 pm

    As gamer and a father, i want the best for my daughter, and i also want to share my love for games with her. Its good to know that science now share my POV

  2. Mr Poutine on December 11, 2021 at 12:47 pm

    Your facial expressions very much adds to my enjoyment of the video! Oh and also the great information in the videos.

  3. Meme Gazer on December 11, 2021 at 1:05 pm

    I noticed a lot of violent criminals listen to music…even more so then they play violent video games.

    To me that is the larger issue.

  4. Michel Ottens on December 11, 2021 at 1:12 pm

    Are there any studies on the effects of video game stigmatization, or the stigmatization of any medium wholesale; the effects of that on how willing people the audience is to discuss or maybe protest problematic content, or whether people get defensive instead, self-deprecating, venerating of the problematic content, or isolated due to the stigmatization?
    I’d imagine if there’s anything causing the mass toxicity or even hostility of a given pop medium or genre’s fanbase, that it has a lot more to do with stigmatization, and a lack of acceptance from wider society, rather than with the specific pop content consumed; like how those effects of stigmatization have been shown to work with ethnic, religious, and political subcultures.
    (I am assuming here that we can all agree that violent mythology is problematic and begs discourse, even if it’s not directly physically manifesting violence in its audience. Often the problematization is the very purpose of violent stories.)

    Edit: Even just a quick google scholar scroll just now shows there is research going on about this, so that’s nice.

  5. Jim Lytle on December 11, 2021 at 1:12 pm

    There has been an increase in the number of school shootings.

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