The Terrifying Ways Edwardians Wired Their Houses | Hidden Killers | Absolute History

The Terrifying Ways Edwardians Wired Their Houses | Hidden Killers | Absolute History

Dr Suzannah Lipscomb looks at the damage caused by the hazardous new inventions lurking in British people’s homes as the 20th century dawned under the reign King Edward VII.

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50 Comments

  1. dioad on November 24, 2020 at 9:04 pm

    That wire wool was awesome especially on shrooms.

  2. Ndlanding on November 24, 2020 at 9:06 pm

    Pronouncing "Nuclear" as "New_ Kew_ Ler" is a disease of the late 20th century, and the lady in red has it bad.

  3. Vulcan Logix ______ on November 24, 2020 at 9:07 pm

    Ugly woke looking presenter. Yeeecky.

  4. 789mark789 on November 24, 2020 at 9:09 pm

    It’s for "femenin hysteria", Doctor. Message me

  5. Alien On a Bike on November 24, 2020 at 9:10 pm

    And yet asbestos was still used in automotive parts (brake pads and shoes, clutch discs, gaskets etc.) even in the 1980s – I used to work with the stuff! I watched a fiend’s grandfather die of asbestosis in the late 1970s – it was a horrific death. I have a watch with radium painted numbers and a toy leopard with radium glowing eyes (I’ve had it for almost 60 years) its eyes no longer glow though. I also have a caravan made in the 1980s that had an ammonia fridge that exploded. They continued using these poisonous chemicals and gases for decades after they were known to be lethal! I expect there will be a programme like this 50 years from now about the lethal things we use today such as artificial sweeteners like aspartame, aluminium in antiperspirants, poisonous artificial food colourants etc. No wonder everybody is getting cancer.

  6. RR Showtime on November 24, 2020 at 9:15 pm

    So the video starts with a lady in red.. The deception code.

  7. rickyleeufc on November 24, 2020 at 9:16 pm

    I literally live a stone’s throw away from the largest asbestos factory known in existence. TBA (turner brothers asbestos) and my grandfather did pass away due to developing asbestosis some 35+ years after stopping working for the company.. what worries me now is, the building for the most part is knocked down for all its nastiness to envelop the local nature reserve right on its doorstep!!

  8. MrAmberol on November 24, 2020 at 9:17 pm

    People survived due mostly to common sense… sadly lacking in this Woke filled vacuum.

  9. Brian O'Connell on November 24, 2020 at 9:17 pm

    I have a question: Why 240V? I mean some could survive a 120V shock, but 240V can kill you.

  10. Kevin Hanes on November 24, 2020 at 9:20 pm

    She is gorgeous. Can you say tomato a few times for me? She even comes with built in fishing tackle!

  11. pdorism on November 24, 2020 at 9:22 pm

    Fun fact, belladonna means beautiful woman in italian. So that’s where that comes from…

  12. Name Surname on November 24, 2020 at 9:24 pm

    Femme ftale in RED aye.

  13. Brian O'Connell on November 24, 2020 at 9:24 pm

    Also, in the US, wiring around that time was more or less bare wires wrapped around ceramic posts in the walls. That’s just begging for an electrical fire.

  14. Whitney on November 24, 2020 at 9:27 pm

    "it does look like a ray gun" No, No it doesnt

  15. Stephen Furley on November 24, 2020 at 9:27 pm

    ‘Both the plug and the socket contained metal’. Well they wouldn’t be of much use if the didn’t, would they?

    We were still on 200 V until about 1960.

    I like the way that a programme which features a device for manipulating hair is presented by a woman who has large quantities of hair which has been manipulated.

  16. CollieAgility on November 24, 2020 at 9:28 pm

    Metal light switches scare the cr@p out of me

  17. Nancy P on November 24, 2020 at 9:28 pm

    I would think that the best development of these times was the notion of testing for effects before sending the products out into the market. Everything is a miracle ‘drug’ until enough people lose their lives.

  18. Stephen Skinner on November 24, 2020 at 9:28 pm

    Well before the terrifying Edwardians it must have been better then? Considering many things were new they were good enough and peoples lives became better than before and what followed was better still.

  19. Suny Dog on November 24, 2020 at 9:29 pm

    She’s supposed to be a serious historian. So why does she dress like a street walking spunker.

  20. ShorUKan on November 24, 2020 at 9:30 pm

    Imagine in a hundred years time when they make a documentary on the smart LED light bulb 💡 and other smart tech.

  21. Charles C on November 24, 2020 at 9:30 pm

    Ah yes, sulphur and ammonia, exactly what I want around my food.

  22. Cassie Henderson on November 24, 2020 at 9:31 pm

    Have I missed her mentioning Tesla ?!?

  23. ricky chen on November 24, 2020 at 9:32 pm

    Youtube: how many ads can we put on your video?
    Absolute history: just f me up.

  24. Marek Krakovský on November 24, 2020 at 9:32 pm

    Name of the "genius" who invented the bare cables?

  25. eaglerising88 on November 24, 2020 at 9:34 pm

    You get a thumbs downs for so many gd ads

  26. Robbo 10 on November 24, 2020 at 9:38 pm

    Got lured in by the hot presenter, wow! And the BBC had told me black people invented electricity and the light bulb so this was enlightening! The Marxists won’t like this video!

  27. Hiren Patel on November 24, 2020 at 9:38 pm

    May be a hollywood fashion but its not ‘nuciler’ its ‘nuclear’.

  28. Sherloid Bai on November 24, 2020 at 9:39 pm

    Whats with all the nose studs….lol

  29. JollyJuice on November 24, 2020 at 9:40 pm

    There’s an undertone of smugness in this video that is really irritating. Like, yeah, people a century ago were using products that we now know are highly dangerous and we’ve made improvements to safety over time. But to act like these people were somehow stupid for using these products is like suggesting that they should have known the dangers of these products like we do now. For all their faults, these were important innovations that we still benefit from now and they should be discussed as such.

  30. Gio Gio on November 24, 2020 at 9:40 pm

    I’m out .can’t concentrate. The chicks too hot.

  31. DahDahDitDitDit DitDitDitDahDah BCNU on November 24, 2020 at 9:41 pm

    I’ve owned houses in the past that had pretty similarly scary installations of stuff – but all done in the sixties/seventies/eighties, etc. DIY sometimes runs amok it seems.

  32. Milkyjoe on November 24, 2020 at 9:42 pm

    I wish my history teacher had looked like her…..

  33. Fifo on November 24, 2020 at 9:43 pm

    I wonder how many regulations and safety measures must have been written in blood…

  34. Jonathan Dear on November 24, 2020 at 9:45 pm

    …and that was the science! Follow the science.

  35. Milton Waddams on November 24, 2020 at 9:47 pm

    Countries like Philippines still freely use asbestos, there are videos on Youtube of guys stuffing it into their motorbike mufflers!

  36. Moshe Rivera on November 24, 2020 at 9:47 pm

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  37. Brandt on November 24, 2020 at 9:47 pm

    i am so disgusted by her makeup that it’s difficult to watch thus. I wish they could present this less biased.

    She seems opposed to this progress.

  38. Underrated on November 24, 2020 at 9:48 pm

    Is it just me, or is the host hot?

  39. Mr Charlie Varrick %%%1 on November 24, 2020 at 9:51 pm

    And today we have bill gates o’bongo and foochee thinning the herd at Wuhan labs. That’s just the tip of the iceberg.

  40. Turtleproof on November 24, 2020 at 9:52 pm

    Is the makeup expert doing a, "Beyond Scared Straight" warning to deter the use of cosmetics?

  41. Ronald Damp on November 24, 2020 at 9:52 pm

    Also forgotten is that in those days most current was dc not ac..dc is FAR more dangerous..

  42. wilson lawson on November 24, 2020 at 9:54 pm

    What do all these things have in common? They’re all attempts to make money. They’re all private, entrepreneurial, unregulated, corporate, greed projects.

  43. shane baker on November 24, 2020 at 9:55 pm

    Going bald indeed *SUCKS ASS!*

  44. iamtheboxer on November 24, 2020 at 9:56 pm

    …yeah yeah yeah… Damn you are GORGEOUS!!!

  45. Peter Smigiel on November 24, 2020 at 9:57 pm

    that nose ring is post divorce?

  46. Duncan Arthur on November 24, 2020 at 9:57 pm

    Electricity is a natural force, not an invention. Otherwise very good

  47. Humboles on November 24, 2020 at 10:00 pm

    I recall how, in the 1950s, my mother still used an electric iron plugged into a bayonet light fitting in the ceiling. I also remember how, always naive about risk, she heard a loose screw rattling inside her Hoover steam iron. She grabbed a table knife to push it out—but the iron was still ‘on’. _There was almighty bang!_ The ‘Ivorine’ handle insulated her from the current, but much of the blade had melted like a welding rod. Domestic fuses were notoriously insensitive, unlike the super-sensitive RCDs that protect us in our homes today.

  48. Swinde on November 24, 2020 at 10:00 pm

    I think the brand was Westclock, and when I was growing up, they marketed an alarm clock with a radium face of the hands and the numbers. It was called "Big Ben". There was no mention of any danger. Later in life I purchased a digital LCD wristwatch which had a tritium backlight. It glowed at all times and allowed you to see the time when it was dark. At some point there was a train wreck in Arizona and a boxcar filled with tritium was derailed and they brought out HazMat personnel to protect the public and contain the tritium. I thought it strange that I was wearing this stuff on my wrist. At some point these watches were no longer offered.

  49. Dan R on November 24, 2020 at 10:01 pm

    I grew up in a house made in about 1950. (USA) None of the outlets were grounded. I remember a socket/ outlet that screwed into a light socket. You could then plug in an electrical device and the light bulb. Had screw in fuses.

  50. inregionecaecorum on November 24, 2020 at 10:03 pm

    I can remember my gran plugging the iron into the light socket in her 1930s house, indeed our own 1950s house had only two 5 amp wall sockets in the living room. Woolies was selling adaptors for light sockets well into the 60s.

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